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Skyforger

How did you start modding/game developing? Tips and tricks?

88 posts in this topic

Hey guys! Skyforger here and I just wanted to make this topic about how did you get to modding and game developing. I've always had a passion for videogames and I always wanted to make my own some day. So I just wanted to ask any of you about how did you first get into making games or modding? What tutorials did you watch? Where is the best place for getting info for different aspects of game making? What is your focus on the matter and why? Do you have your own tips and tricks on how did you learn some of this stuff?

 

So I really want to get into this. Now more than ever. I live in Finland and I study at a vocational school. We have some great gamedev companies here and I need to learn more about game developing in general so I could have a chance for getting an internship at some company. If you guys could help me on this matter I would greatly appreciate this. I had hoped I could do something for you guys in Druid Gameworks but I don't really know what you think about it. That was just one idea but it would be great. I have three months until I have to get the internship somewhere. It's just that the Finnish gamedev companies demand quite a lot so it's hard for me to get into it.

 

I know that I could just find all the info myself on the internet but I just wanted some real opinions and as I progress on modeling, scripting, all that stuff I could show my progress here for you guys and get some tips here and there. I've watched a lot of Brackeys' Unity tutorials and they are great so I know the basics. :P I've been getting into blender lately, and I really like to write my own stories and draw all kinds of stuff. Ever since I was able to write and draw clearly i've made hundreds of different comics and stories, sadly not much is left from the time. I have some experience in Photoshop and Illustrator.

 

This topic is just so that I could really get myself to doing things and get motivation from this great community we have here :thumbsup: I have a lot of free time and instead of just playing games all day long I could everyday use some time in learning because I really, really want to.

 

Just a little something to talk about :cookie:

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Hey Skyforger!
 
Great question. I'm also interested in reading what people have to say about this.
 
One thing that I struggle(d) with is keeping projects small enough so they are realistic and I can finish them. I've tried making a simple "Windows Forms" text-based RPG and I started with so many ideas and no focus at all. So I had all kinds of things not even half done. I've restarted the project several times and I now have a turn-based fighting system that actually does something. No magic, simple items and armors, a shop and just fighting one on one. No XP, simple skills and attributes that the player can increase after each fight. But it's something! And I can expend on it whenever I feel like it (which hasn't happened yet :P).
 
This also happened in my "Skyrim Modding career". One idea let to another and before you know it, the story is at least 10 A4 pages long of "general idea" with ambitious ideas that you don't even know whether they're possible. While writing and being creative is fun, in the end it wasn't very productive.
 
I'm a software engineer, so writing code is up my alley. But knowing general programming techniques is all good and well, but I guess the usage depend on the language and the environment. E.g. I can code Papyrus, but I'm still very unsure on how to let my code interact with other objects in the CK and tie everything together. With Unity (which I've never used), it's probably different, with a certain "API" to talk to. And most games use C++, which I don't know either. As far as I know, it's a powerful, but abstract language, so not very easy. But I might be wrong :)
 
Well, I don't have much to add on the other subjects. Learn by doing is my advice. As for motivation, you could consider joining a modding team or working on a request basis. Hey! I could use a modified Dwarven Dagger. I've planned an Orc character who crafted an Orc Dagger with Dwarven materials, so a unique model would be great! :D
 

So I just wanted to ask any of you about how did you first get into making games or modding?

I was disappointed with the Blades in Skyrim and thought their hideout had huge potential for a player house. So I searched on the Nexus forums, found "Reforging the Blades" and joined up (this was when the CK wasn't out yet). Long story short, the mod failed, fell apart, I joined another group of a mod called "Skyrim Main Quest Overhaul" (yeah :yes:), written lots of great stories, had lots of fun, but CK work? Hmpf. So now we're restart the project, with the process well thought out and focus on development, instead of perfect story. And that's where I'm at, getting everything thought out.
 

What tutorials did you watch?

Related to Skyrim Modding:
Creation Kit
Official Bethesda Game Studios Video Tutorials
Long list of video tutorials
 

Where is the best place for getting info for different aspects of game making?

I don't know. RPG Maker VX? XD
 

What is your focus on the matter and why?

On game design? I would say player choice and great characters. But in the opposite order. Since the consequences of choices comes from the reactions of great characters :D
 

Do you have your own tips and tricks on how did you learn some of this stuff?

I guess it's watching tutorials "Just in Time". Don't watch everything at once, but learn enough to continue your work and try out what you just learned. But that mostly applies to how I learned interior design.

Many other things are trial and error, which isn't optimal. Preferably, you would have a mentor of some sort to help when you get stuck.

 

So, that's my experiences! Good luck with all your efforts!

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Hi Skyforger, Jibs!

First off like most things you will want to start off at a pace comfortable for you. Take your time to get a feel of the techniques, I assume you have already done this. If not do that first! Also you do not want to underestimate the motivation you can get from peer pressure. Check around the active modding sites out there, see which are active, which projects have a mixture of experienced and novice modders, which projects are looking for people to join them, etc.

My preference is to sign up to a team with a mixture of veteran and new modders. My take is that such teams will be more accustomed to working with new modders, they will be more willing to be patient and pass on their tips and tricks. Another thing I feel you should keep in mind is not to be too quick to join a group. Take some time to look at their past works. Is what they have done interesting to you? Because their latest project will probably be along the same theme or quality. You got to want to do what they do before you will be able to give it your all and do well.

Another point is do not reject a role just because it was not what you originally intended to do. It is possible the team sees you are more suitable for a role you did not pick initially. Give that a try. Having tried is better than not at all. Peer pressure if taken in moderation can be a good thing. Seeing results from your teammates and having them encourage you to do your part, often leads to you finishing your part.

I hope you will have a fun time exploring because that is above all what you should do now, look around to find the one role that is made for you!

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I'm not a fan of video tutorials, I find they move to fast and you lose a lot of important information. Instead I'm going to suggest some written tutorials, TES Alliance has it's own collection of modding tutorials in a section called The Enclave, many of the tutorials were written by members of the DGS Dev team :)

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I went for a quick browse at The Enclave. I could see the instructors had put in effort to make their presentations, certainly a good resource for beginners look to take a dip in modding. Thank you IS for the referral.

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That is very interesting indeed! Thank you guys for the responses I'm sure to look at The Enclave tutorials today! :)

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There are so many of them Sky, you might want to take a page from Jibs, lay back  :holiday:  relax, take it in slowly :guinness:  have a snack :)

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Hey,

 

It's always good to see new people try their hand at modding and wanting to make games! As for myself, I started making content for games back in 2001ish (I'm 19 now) with the good old map editor for Red Alert on the PC. Man those were times, when I could create content with only 16MB of RAM and a dated (at the time, definitely now!) copy of Windows 98! Of course most of it was horribly imbalanced in my favour, but still it lit the spark that drives me to this day- make stuff I wanna play.

From Red Alert I moved into the Dawn of War series, creating more maps and dabbling in the 'Object Editor', which allowed me to create insanely accurate space marines to mow down tons of orks but still somehow get overwhelmed. Anyway, as to how I learnt? Trial and error mostly, at the beginning I had little to no access to the internet so asking others for help was impossible, later on I realised I was 4 years late to the party and so I couldn't ask my own questions. So figuring things out became a constant challenge for me.

 

As for now? I mostly mod in Skyrim, though I plan to pick it up in The Witcher 2 and Star Citizen. Tutorials, both written and video are a plenty around the web as well as some in paperback. So my advice to you is this: Have a go yourself, don't know what to do? Try something and then google it, but don't give up. If you really don't know what to do, try to work around it until you have figured it out. We all were rookie's once, we are all getting there, some more so than others.

 

P.S. Don't make my rookie mistake of thinking the BIOS for your PC is the Red Alert scripting mechanic. That's how I ruined my computer back in the early days.

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@Skyforger: Another interesting way to learn is through reverse engineering. Way back when I was learning to mod for Fallout3 I would disect and pull apart my favourite mods and then (most importantly) put them back together again.  This gave me a real hands-on learning curve with regards to Bethesdas engine and tools.  The more you learn whilst pulling things apart, the better you get at it.

 

Our recent exploits with the Havok Engine was a challenge because their just isn't a lot of tutorial documentation available for it. Instead, I just spent my time ripping it apart to see how it worked and ended up learning a ton of stuff that wasn't documented.  I personally find this way of a learning to be heaps of fun.

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408d273385.png

 

It's not much, but it's a start  XD Just one quick tutorial and this is the result. It's quite fun actually when you get the hang of it. Now how about a little break and then some more practise?  :icecream:

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That's really impressive if you ask me. It's good to see that you're already improving previously made work! Keep up the good work! :dance:

 

What's next, the table to put 'um on? Or the teapot? :D

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Thanks Sky! Feel free to post up mini updates on your progress, A small object is just as good as a grand example so long as you polish it up with the same degree of loving care. Every little success will build up your motivation, will improve your abilities. I look forward to your next presentation. Keep up the wonderful energy Sky :)

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Thanks guys XD  I'm using blender.

 

Oh and this is little something I made with Illustrator. I made a map (not nearly finished) for my game that I will make somewhere in the far future :laugh:

 

kartta_zps901d6bbf.jpg

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That is very nice, reminds me of England :happy: I can almost imagine an adventure forming, of a grand quest as a pawn of the Gods, as they plot to be relevant again.

 

Slightly off topic here, seeing this makes me want to suggest the team should start releasing maps, so we can make up our own adventures, even without elaborate concept art or screenshots. Good 'old pen n paper RPG style.

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That wood texture on the table is great! That chain isn't bad either.  :laugh:

 

Seriously, I think the chain is amazing!

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Thanks Flintsteel :) But yeah, the textures on the chain and the table were given by the tutorial maker for this practise.

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